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Growing up with a hearing loss

Two girls on play equipmentMost grown-ups think that childhood is the best time of one's life. Most children, on the other hand, say that it’s tough being a child. And children with hearing loss may experience an even tougher time growing up.

The good news is that, as a parent, you can do a lot to make your child’s life easier. A hearing loss doesn’t have to restrict your child's ability to communicate, socialise, learn, and enjoy all the experiences life has to offer. Besides, today’s hearing instruments are so advanced that even children with profound hearing loss can benefit from using them.

It is important to remember, however, that all children - with or without hearing loss - develop differently. Every child is unique, and every child reacts in a different way. That’s why it is important to learn everything you possibly can about your child's particular situation.

Raising a child with hearing loss is challenging, and there is no such thing as one correct answer or a perfect way to behave. But the more you can learn about the challenges your child faces, the better equipped you will be to support them.

Many parents believe that hearing instruments will restore their child’s hearing. Unfortunately, they cannot. But they CAN help to improve your child’s quality of life. Even when wearing hearing instruments your child will remain hearing impaired - a situation to which your family, friends, and relatives will need to adjust.

Of course, the more you can get involved, the easier life will be. Whenever you have any concerns, or questions, don't hesitate to ask teachers, audiologists and other professionals. They will do their utmost to help and support you.

The best advice we can offer is to love, accept and encourage your child. Praise them when they do something well. Smile as often as possible - because a smile means much more to a child with a hearing loss. Pay attention when your child wants to share something with you - even small things. Read bedtime stories, do physical activities, and sing songs. These loving, caring activities stimulate your child and make them feel relaxed and confident.


Information provided by Oticon. Reproduced with permission.
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10-Nov-2015 12:44 PM (AEST)